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dc.rights.licenseAl consultar y hacer uso de este recurso, está aceptando las condiciones de uso establecidas por los autores.es_CO
dc.contributor.advisorRealpe Rebolledo, Emilio Antonio 
dc.contributor.advisorSrivastava, Diane
dc.contributor.advisorMolina Escobar, Jorge Alberto 
dc.contributor.advisorValenzuela, Luciano
dc.contributor.authorOspina Bautista, María Fabiola
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-27T16:35:32Z
dc.date.available2018-09-27T16:35:32Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1992/7656
dc.description.abstractUnderstanding the factors that drive community stmcture and ecosystem processes are a relevant goal in ecology. One factor is environmental heterogeneity that alters communities through changes in habitat and available resource for species; however, it is unclear if those effects can change according to the spatial scale. Another factor is climate change, which affects community composition and ecosystem functionality through the loss of particular predator species; although, it is unknown if rainfall variability can alter the community and energy and nutrient flux in temporal ecosystems, such as ponds or phytotelmata. We used the community within two phytotelmata, ecological model system in order to assess effect regime on communities and ecosystem processes. bromeliads and tree holes, as an of spatial scale and hydrological regime on communities and ecosystem processes. First, we studied the invertebrate community associated to Guzmania multiflora (André) André ex Mez. (Bromeliaceae) and their biological traits. We assessed the relation between biological traits and habitat complexity and resource availability. We found that habitat complexity not only alters the taxonomical diversity of invertebrates in bromeliads but also their functional diversity tlnough changes in the abundance and richness of biological traits. In this regard, biological traits provide an approach to ecosystem processes and invertebrate adaptations to environmental conditions. Second, we investigated the effects of spatial scale dependence of habitat and detritus on community and decomposition. We found that species turnover of invertebrates associated with free holes depended on a spatial scale and that there was a scale-dependent effect of habitat and litter on the community and litter decomposition. Third, we assessed the relationship between the amount and frequency of precipitation and bromeliad community and functioning. We found that the magnitude of precipitation rather than rainfall frequency affected invertebrate communities, decomposition, and primary productivity. Finally, we analyzed the energy and nitrogen flux in a bromeliad invertebrate food web and its interaction with the loss of an intraguild predator. We found that the interaction between shifts in the amount of precipitation and the presence/absence of the predator altered the energy and nitrogen flow in the bromeliad food webes_CO
dc.format.extent198 hojases_CO
dc.language.isospaes_CO
dc.publisherBogotá - Uniandeses_CO
dc.sourceinstname:Universidad de los Andeses_CO
dc.sourcereponame:Sénecaes_CO
dc.titleEffects of the precipitation regimen and spatial scale on the invertebrate communities and ecosystem processes in phytotelmataes_CO
dc.typedoctoralThesises_CO
dc.publisher.programDoctorado en Ciencias - Biologíaes_CO
dc.rights.accessRightsopenAccess
dc.subject.keywordEcosistemas - Investigacioneses_CO
dc.subject.keywordEcología acuática - Investigacioneses_CO
dc.subject.keywordHábitat acuático - Investigacioneses_CO
dc.subject.keywordPlantas hospedantes - Investigacioneses_CO
dc.creator.degreeTesis (Doctor En Ciencias - Biología) -- Universidad de los Andeses_CO
dc.identifier.urlhttp://biblioteca.uniandes.edu.co/acepto2015201.php?id=6911.pdfes_CO
dc.publisher.facultyFacultad de Cienciases_CO
dc.publisher.departmentDepartamento de Biologíaes_CO
dc.type.versionpublishedVersion


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