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dc.rights.licenseAl consultar y hacer uso de este recurso, está aceptando las condiciones de uso establecidas por los autores.es_CO
dc.contributor.advisorCadena Ordóñez, Carlos Daniel
dc.contributor.advisorRyan, Michael
dc.contributor.advisorMolina Escobar, Jorge Alberto 
dc.contributor.advisorSlabbekoorn, Hans
dc.contributor.authorLaverde Rodríguez, Oscar Alberto
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-27T16:35:59Z
dc.date.available2018-09-27T16:35:59Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1992/7678
dc.description.abstractThe evolution of communication signals is a central, integrative topic in evolutionary biology. In this dissertation, I propose that achieving a comprehensive understanding of the evolution of such signals requires not only considering different theories in isolation (i.e. the transfer and sensory drive hypotheses), but also possible interactions between theories and disciplines. For example, the negative association between communication signals observed by Darwin might be strongly determined by adaptation for communication to different habitats: Each habitat has its own features affecting the efficacy of communication, and animals should evolve strategies to optimize signal salience in the face of resolving potential tradeoffs. Based on this overall framework we tested hypothesis about the evolution of and relationships between acoustic and visual signals in relation to habitat features. I used birds as a model system, but the approach and conclusions likely apply to other animals using both acoustic and signals for communication. Specifically, this work focused on three different study systems which allowed me to approach the relationships between types of signals from different perspectives: (1) two species complexes in the tinamou family (Tinamidae) differing in patterns of variation in plumage and vocalizations, (2) a widely distributed family of passerine birds with species exhibiting different communication strategies and occurring in contrasting habitats (i.e the New World warblers, Parulidae), and (3) an assemblage of multiple species coexisting locally in tropical montane forest site. Additionally, i explored the use and relevance of information contained in sound collections for studies on the ecology and evolution of animal communicationes_CO
dc.formatapplication/pdfes_CO
dc.format.extent125 hojases_CO
dc.language.isoenges_CO
dc.publisherUniandeses_CO
dc.sourceinstname:Universidad de los Andeses_CO
dc.sourcereponame:Repositorio Institucional Sénecaes_CO
dc.titleVisual and acoustic communication signals in birds - taxonomy, evolution and transfer between signals mediated by sensory drivees_CO
dc.typedoctoralThesises_CO
dc.publisher.programDoctorado en Ciencias - Biologíaes_CO
dc.rights.accessRightsopenAccess
dc.subject.keywordOrnitología - Investigacioneses_CO
dc.subject.keywordComunicación animal - Investigacioneses_CO
dc.subject.keywordProducción del sonido por animales - Investigacioneses_CO
dc.subject.keywordAves - Distribución geográfica - Investigaciones - América del Sures_CO
dc.subject.keywordAves - Color - Investigacioneses_CO
dc.subject.keywordCripsis - Investigacioneses_CO
dc.subject.keywordFilogenia - Investigacioneses_CO
dc.publisher.facultyFacultad de Cienciases_CO
dc.publisher.departmentDepartamento de Biologíaes_CO
dc.type.versionpublishedVersion
dc.description.degreenameDoctor en Ciencias - Biologíaes_CO
dc.description.degreelevelDoctoradoes_CO


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